Stock Structure of East Coast Sharks

Life history and genetic structure of three commercially targeted sharks in temperate eastern Australian waters

Pascal_Geraghty_May2014Pascal Geraghty has completed his PhD thesis at Macquarie University, Sydney. Pascal studied three shark species (dusky shark - Carcharhinus obscurus, , spinner shark - C. brevipinna, and sandbar shark - C. plumbeus). The thesis addresses important questions about the resilience of populations to fishing-induced mortality and the sustainability of the local fishery in inshore waters adjacent to the Australian states of New South Wales and southern Queensland. New data is also presented about the biological stock status of these species in Australia and surrounding waters, which will assist in  managing these important fisheries. Pascal's thesis is available for download here. Congratulations to Pascal for his graduation in May 2014.
By : Jenny Ovenden /August 01, 2014 /Latest News /Comments Off on Life history and genetic structure of three commercially targeted sharks in temperate eastern Australian waters Read More

Shark research makes it into the 2014 Guinness Book of Records

[caption id="attachment_862" align="alignleft" width="218"]Cover A more impressive place for research compared to your average scientific journal?[/caption] Getting into the Guinness Book of Records is a lifetime goal for many. We did it by discovering hybridisation between two species of sharks. The original article can be found here. The lead author Jess Morgan is an MFL associate.
By : Jenny Ovenden /December 11, 2013 /Latest News /Comments Off on Shark research makes it into the 2014 Guinness Book of Records Read More

Genetics and Queensland sharks

Jess and Jenny updated fisheries stock assessment modellers (George from the Queensland Government; Peter from CARM at UQ) about the spatial extent of populations of commercially harvested shark species in Queensland. Genetic information will guide the extent of the models along the Queensland coast. For example milkshark are likely to be a single population, but blacktip sharks may be two populations. The mathematical models will be used by fisheries managers to ensure shark catches remain at sustainable levels. L - R George Leigh, Jenny Ovenden, Jess Morgan and Peter Baxter.
By : Jenny Ovenden /November 07, 2013 /Uncategorized /Comments Off on Genetics and Queensland sharks Read More

Goin’ for a spin ………

A new paper from PhD student Pascal Geraghty suggests that large sharks don't move along the coasts as far as expected. Pascal's work shows that spinner sharks (Carcharhinus brevipinna) from Australia are separate to those in southern Africa. There may also be two separate populations in tropical Australian waters. Want to know more? Click here to read the paper. PLoS image Cbrev
By : Jenny Ovenden /October 29, 2013 /Latest News /Comments Off on Goin’ for a spin ……… Read More